Tag Archives: Lifecycle Management

Open Services for Lifecycle Collaboration

I can honestly say that I when I wrote my post about ALM and middleware, I hadn’t heard about the Open Services for Lifecycle Collaboration initiative. But it is exactly the kind of thing I had in mind. These guys are working on the definition of a minimum (but expandable) set of features and functions that allow easy integration between the various tools, which can usually be found in an organization. To my knowledge no products exist yet, but I really like the idea and approach.

Lifecycle Management with SOA and BPM: Part 2

One response I got for my post on Lifecycle Management was the following:

Are you saying that one idea is that an organisation can run its whole development lifecycle by modelling it inside of a BPM tool, using it like a workflow manager?

Yes, exactly. Many people are currently thinking about how they can streamline the approval chains they have around their software development processes. The challenge here is in many cases that the tools (project management, spreadsheets, …) are disconnected from the layer where the actual work happens. And we all know what happens in such a case sooner rather than later…

So the idea is to connect the various layers that have a role here. The top-level of such a process is usually about the “stage” of a software asset (e.g. new application, enhancement, bug fix etc.). What you can then do is manage the transition from one stage to another (e.g. from development to testing) by means of a BPM system. This is the first level of visibility.

To take things a step further would then mean to also connect the stuff that gets you a deeper insight. Those would typically be the technical systems like issue tracking (these have a broader scope than just bug tracking), built systems, results from automated testing etc.

So at the end it all comes back to the idea of end-to-end visibility. And here, once more, the advantage of a universal BPM system (as opposed to something that comes together with a specific application like CRM or ERP) kicks in: You can connect pretty much everything quickly and then model the process you want.

And for management the whole thing comes with reporting and business activity monitoring (BAM) out-of-the-box. So you not only know what’s going on an individual level but also get the complete picture in real-time whenever you want. I would think that this is what many managers are longing for.

Lifecycle Management with SOA and BPM: 1+1> 2

For some time the topics of SOA Governance and BPM have been looked at as if they were two relatively unrelated things. And this perception is correct in the sense that you don’t have to have them together. However, more and more people realize what huge additional benefits are in for them if they combine the two things. In many cases the idea is that you need some logic to govern the actual work (design, development, testing etc.) for a process that has been modeled in a nice fancy tool.

But you can also do it the other way around: Think about what you would get if you could govern your whole IT lifecycle management from one tool. The idea goes like this: You store all relevant information about “objects” that are relevant for your organization in a central repository, and the different attributes that describes those objects (aka assets) are completely freely configurable. You probably need to attach additional information to them, like existing documentation etc. So in a way you can think of these information in the repository as a way to store the knowledge about all relevant aspects of the organization and then leverage this knowledge.

Now based on that groundwork, whenever a request for a new a feature in the IT landscape comes in, you can have it go through a “workflow”. The first steps would probably be about an approval chain. So people from various functions (e.g. product management, operations, security, marketing etc.) would need to either approve or reject this. How the final outcome is determined can be a bit tricky (and is much more a political topic than a technical one).

Then come steps like gathering requirements, signing them off, doing the development etc. You probably also want to integrate this whole thing with your development chain (automated testing, continuous integration etc.). At any given point in time you know where your development stands in terms of the project plan.

So if you step back a bit and look at what you get, we are not talking about development tools any more. Instead this is true, real-time end-to-end visibility. There are clear responsibilities for assigning tasks (a human being has to decide on something) and you no longer need to fear emails that are lost in the inbox of someone’s email program. Instead you get a view into the currently open tasks, their due dates etc. Other advantages existing but for now those are the critical ones. The reason for this is that these functionalities allow you to have automatically generated documentation that satisfies your compliance requirements. In most organizations these things eat up enormous amounts of resources and affect processes that should deliver value to the organization.

Let’s leave it here for now. I am quite interested in your comments on this, so please let me know.